Address

University of Applied Sciences Emden/Leer, Constantiaplatz 4, 26723 Emden, Room S109

Contact Information

Call: +49 4921 8071877

Email: yusra.tehreem@hs-emden-leer.de

Yusra Tehreem, M.Sc.

Research Associate

Hochschule Emden/Leer

Yusra Tehreem is a Marie Sklodowska-Curie researcher for ETN-CHARMING project. Her objective is to explore the potential of Virtual Reality for the advanced training of employees in the field of chemical industry. 

Publications

  • T. Gallagher, B. Slof, M. van der Schaaf, R. Toyoda, Y. Tehreem, S. G. Fracaro, and L. Kester, “Comparison with Self vs Comparison with Others: The Influence of Learning Analytics Dashboard Design on Learner Dashboard Use,” in Games and Learning Alliance, Cham, 2022, p. 11–21. doi:10.1007/978-3-031-22124-8_2
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This study uses log-file data to investigates how chemical process plant employees interact and engage with two distinct learning analytics dashboard designs, which are implemented in a virtual reality simulation-based training environment. The learning analytics dashboard designs differ by reference frame: the progress reference frame, offers historical performance data as a point of comparison and the social reference frame offers aggregated average peer group performance data as a point of comparison. Results show that participants who receive a progress reference frame are likely to spend less time reviewing their dashboard than those who receive a social reference. However, those who receive a progress reference frame are more likely to spend more time reviewing detailed task feedback and engaging with the learning analytics dashboard.

    @InProceedings{10.1007/978-3-031-22124-8_2,
    author="Gallagher, Timothy
    and Slof, Bert
    and van der Schaaf, Marieke
    and Toyoda, Ryo
    and Tehreem, Yusra
    and Fracaro, Sofia Garcia
    and Kester, Liesbeth",
    editor="Kiili, Kristian
    and Antti, Koskinen
    and de Rosa, Francesca
    and Dindar, Muhterem
    and Kickmeier-Rust, Michael
    and Bellotti, Francesco",
    title="Comparison with Self vs Comparison with Others: The Influence of Learning Analytics Dashboard Design on Learner Dashboard Use",
    booktitle="Games and Learning Alliance",
    year="2022",
    publisher="Springer International Publishing",
    address="Cham",
    pages="11--21",
    abstract="This study uses log-file data to investigates how chemical process plant employees interact and engage with two distinct learning analytics dashboard designs, which are implemented in a virtual reality simulation-based training environment. The learning analytics dashboard designs differ by reference frame: the progress reference frame, offers historical performance data as a point of comparison and the social reference frame offers aggregated average peer group performance data as a point of comparison. Results show that participants who receive a progress reference frame are likely to spend less time reviewing their dashboard than those who receive a social reference. However, those who receive a progress reference frame are more likely to spend more time reviewing detailed task feedback and engaging with the learning analytics dashboard.",
    isbn="978-3-031-22124-8",
    url= {https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-031-22124-8_2},
    doi={10.1007/978-3-031-22124-8_2}
    }

  • Y. Tehreem, S. G. Fracaro, T. Gallagher, R. Toyoda, K. Bernaerts, J. Glassey, F. R. Abegão, S. Wachsmuth, M. Wilk, and T. Pfeiffer, “May I Remain Seated: A Pilot Study on the Impact of Reducing Room-Scale Trainings to Seated Conditions for Long Procedural Virtual Reality Trainings,” in 2022 8th International Conference on Virtual Reality (ICVR), 2022, pp. 62-71. doi:10.1109/ICVR55215.2022.9848222
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Although modern consumer level head-mounted-displays of today provide high-quality room scale tracking, and thus support a high level of immersion and presence, there are application contexts in which constraining oneself to seated set-ups is necessary. Classroom sized training groups are one highly relevant example. However, what is lost when constraining cybernauts to a stationary seated physical space? What is the impact on immersion, presence, cybersickness and what implications does this have on training success? Can a careful design for seated virtual reality (VR) amend some of these aspects? In this line of research, the study provides data on a comparison between standing and seated long (50–60 min) procedural VR training sessions of chemical operators in a realistic and lengthy chemical procedure (combination of digital and physical actions) inside a large 3-floor virtual chemical plant. Besides, a VR training framework based on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs (MHN) is also proposed to systematically analyze the needs in VR environments. In the first of a series of studies, the physiological and safety needs of MHN are evaluated among seated and standing groups in the form of cybersickness, usability and user experience. The results (n=32, real personnel of a chemical plant) show no statistically significant differences among seated and standing groups. There were low levels of cybersickness along with good scores of usability and user experience for both conditions. From these results, it can be implied that the seated condition does not impose significant problems that might hinder its application in classroom training. A follow-up study with a larger sample will provide a more detailed analysis on differences in experienced presence and learning success.

    @inproceedings{Tehreem2022MayIRemainSeated,
    author={Tehreem, Yusra and Fracaro, Sofia Garcia and Gallagher, Timothy and Toyoda, Ryo and Bernaerts, Kristel and Glassey, Jarka and Abeg{\~{a}}o, Fernando Russo and Wachsmuth, Sven and Wilk, Michael and Pfeiffer, Thies},
    booktitle={2022 8th International Conference on Virtual Reality (ICVR)},
    title={May I Remain Seated: A Pilot Study on the Impact of Reducing Room-Scale Trainings to Seated Conditions for Long Procedural Virtual Reality Trainings},
    abstract={Although modern consumer level head-mounted-displays of today provide high-quality room scale tracking, and thus support a high level of immersion and presence, there are application contexts in which constraining oneself to seated set-ups is necessary. Classroom sized training groups are one highly relevant example. However, what is lost when constraining cybernauts to a stationary seated physical space? What is the impact on immersion, presence, cybersickness and what implications does this have on training success? Can a careful design for seated virtual reality (VR) amend some of these aspects? In this line of research, the study provides data on a comparison between standing and seated long (50–60 min) procedural VR training sessions of chemical operators in a realistic and lengthy chemical procedure (combination of digital and physical actions) inside a large 3-floor virtual chemical plant. Besides, a VR training framework based on Maslow's hierarchy of needs (MHN) is also proposed to systematically analyze the needs in VR environments. In the first of a series of studies, the physiological and safety needs of MHN are evaluated among seated and standing groups in the form of cybersickness, usability and user experience. The results (n=32, real personnel of a chemical plant) show no statistically significant differences among seated and standing groups. There were low levels of cybersickness along with good scores of usability and user experience for both conditions. From these results, it can be implied that the seated condition does not impose significant problems that might hinder its application in classroom training. A follow-up study with a larger sample will provide a more detailed analysis on differences in experienced presence and learning success.},
    year={2022},
    pages={62-71},
    url= {https://mixality.de/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Tehreem2022ICVR.pdf},
    doi={10.1109/ICVR55215.2022.9848222}
    }

  • S. Garcia Fracaro, P. Chan, T. Gallagher, Y. Tehreem, R. Toyoda, B. Kristel, G. Jarka, T. Pfeiffer, B. Slof, S. Wachsmuth, and M. Wilk, “Towards Design Guidelines for Virtual Reality Training for the Chemical Industry,” Education for Chemical Engineers, 2021. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ece.2021.01.014
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Operator training in the chemical industry is important because of the potentially hazardous nature of procedures and the way operators’ mistakes can have serious consequences on process operation and safety. Currently, operator training is facing some challenges, such as high costs, safety limitations and time constraints. Also, there have been some indications of a lack of engagement of employees during mandatory training. Immersive technologies can provide solutions to these challenges. Specifically, virtual reality (VR) has the potential to improve the way chemical operators experience training sessions, increasing motivation, virtually exposing operators to unsafe situations, and reducing classroom training time. In this paper, we present research being conducted to develop a virtual reality training solution as part of the EU Horizon 2020 CHARMING Project, a project focusing on the education of current and future chemical industry stakeholders. This paper includes the design principles for a virtual reality training environment including the features that enhance the effectiveness of virtual reality training such as game-based learning elements, learning analytics, and assessment methods. This work can assist those interested in exploring the potential of virtual reality training environments in the chemical industry from a multidisciplinary perspective.

    @article{GARCIAFRACARO2021,
    title = {{T}owards {D}esign {G}uidelines for {V}irtual {R}eality {T}raining for the {C}hemical {I}ndustry},
    journal = {{E}ducation for {C}hemical {E}ngineers},
    year = {2021},
    issn = {1749-7728},
    doi = {https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ece.2021.01.014},
    url = {https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1749772821000142},
    author = {Sofia {Garcia Fracaro} and Philippe Chan and Timothy Gallagher and Yusra Tehreem and Ryo Toyoda and Bernaerts Kristel and Glassey Jarka and Thies Pfeiffer and Bert Slof and Sven Wachsmuth and Michael Wilk},
    keywords = {Virtual Reality, Chemical industry, Operator training, Learning analytics, Gamebased learning, assessment},
    abstract = {Operator training in the chemical industry is important because of the potentially hazardous nature of procedures and the way operators' mistakes can have serious consequences on process operation and safety. Currently, operator training is facing some challenges, such as high costs, safety limitations and time constraints. Also, there have been some indications of a lack of engagement of employees during mandatory training. Immersive technologies can provide solutions to these challenges. Specifically, virtual reality (VR) has the potential to improve the way chemical operators experience training sessions, increasing motivation, virtually exposing operators to unsafe situations, and reducing classroom training time. In this paper, we present research being conducted to develop a virtual reality training solution as part of the EU Horizon 2020 CHARMING Project, a project focusing on the education of current and future chemical industry stakeholders. This paper includes the design principles for a virtual reality training environment including the features that enhance the effectiveness of virtual reality training such as game-based learning elements, learning analytics, and assessment methods. This work can assist those interested in exploring the potential of virtual reality training environments in the chemical industry from a multidisciplinary perspective.}
    }

  • Y. Tehreem and T. Pfeiffer, “Immersive Virtual Reality Training for the Operation of Chemical Reactors,” in DELFI 2020 – Die 18. Fachtagung Bildungstechnologien der Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V., Bonn, 2020, pp. 359-360.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This paper discusses virtual reality (VR) training for chemical operators on hazardous or costly operations of chemical plants. To this end, a prototypical training scenario is developed which will be deployed to industrial partners and evaluated regarding efficiency and effectiveness. In this paper, the current version of the prototype is presented, that allows life-sized trainings in a virtual simulation of a chemical reactor. Building up on this prototype scenario, means for measuring performance, providing feedback, and guiding users through VR-based trainings are explored and evaluated, targeting at an optimized transfer of knowledge from virtual to real world. This work is embedded in the Marie-Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network CHARMING3, in which 15 PhD candidates from six European countries are cooperating.

    @inproceedings{tehreem2020immersive,
    author = {Tehreem, Yusra AND Pfeiffer, Thies},
    title = {Immersive Virtual Reality Training for the Operation of Chemical Reactors},
    booktitle = {DELFI 2020 – Die 18. Fachtagung Bildungstechnologien der Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V.},
    year = {2020},
    editor = {Zender, Raphael AND Ifenthaler, Dirk AND Leonhardt, Thiemo AND Schumacher, Clara},
    pages = { 359-360 },
    publisher = {Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V.},
    address = {Bonn},
    url = {https://dl.gi.de/bitstream/handle/20.500.12116/34186/359%20DELFI2020_paper_81.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y},
    abstract = {This paper discusses virtual reality (VR) training for chemical operators on hazardous or costly operations of chemical plants. To this end, a prototypical training scenario is developed which will be deployed to industrial partners and evaluated regarding efficiency and effectiveness. In this paper, the current version of the prototype is presented, that allows life-sized trainings in a virtual simulation of a chemical reactor. Building up on this prototype scenario, means for measuring performance, providing feedback, and guiding users through VR-based trainings are explored and evaluated, targeting at an optimized transfer of knowledge from virtual to real world. This work is embedded in the Marie-Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network CHARMING3, in which 15 PhD candidates from six European countries are cooperating.}
    }

Education

  1. 2016

    Masters of Computer Science

    University of Evora, Portugal
  2. 2014

    Bachelors of Software Engineering

    Fatima Jinnah Women University, Pakistan

Experience

  1. 2017-2019
    Software Quality Assurance Engineer
    Infiniun Healthcare Pvt Limited, Pakistan
  2. 2016-2017
    V&V Automated Test Analyst (Traineeship)
    Pathology Solutions, Philips, United Kingdom

Awards

  • 2018
    Marie Sklodowska-Curie PhD Fellowship (Germany)
    ETN-CHARMING (European Union)
  • 2016
    Erasmus Traineeship Grant (United Kingdom)
    Erasmus Mundus (European Union)
  • 2013
    EMMA-West Masters Scholarship (Portugal)
    Erasmus Mundus (European Union)